A Nursing Home Christmas in Photos

But Mary treasured up all these things, pondering them in her heart. 
Luke 2:19

I am kind of a photo junkie. I both take way too many (Thank God for the digital age!) and I enjoy going through old family photos. I know that in Heaven everything will be made new, but here on earth I treasure these special memories. I especially love Christmas times past, and photos help me remember the sights, sounds, and smells of moments that have slipped by over the years. Christmas time at nursing home is a lot different from ones we have had at home. Being in the midst of a Christmas program or caroling can be so overwhelmingly bust that it is easy to forget the faces and the individual people we came for. In fact, I get very few of my own because usually both hands are occupied with my guitar, so I am so glad my friends sent me some of theirs. Here is a brief journey through several of the homes we had the privilege to visit this year.

Beyond the Communion Table

And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”         Luke 22:19 ESV

Last time we talked about how much people need for us to serve communion at their nursing home. This week we are going to look a little deeper into what exactly God has in His heart for nursing home ministry as a whole. When Jesus first gave us the sacrament of communion He summed it up with the phrase; “Do this in remembrance of me.” The act of communion which is blessed and holy; is still only an avenue by which we are remembering our connection with Jesus. What really matters is not the ritual; but the relationship which the ritual is meant to remind us of.

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In that same way; it is important to not only serve communion; but to remember that everything we do in ministry is to bring people into relationship with Jesus Christ. The bread and the wine are regular reminders the of the cross; our forgiveness and salvation in Christ. As one part of the body of Christ our job is to also act as reminders of God’s grace. We should use whatever means; opportunities and talents that we have; including bringing in the communion meal; to build relationships that help people connect to Jesus Christ.

 

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Serving Communion at Nursing Home

For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.   1 Corinthians 11:26 NIV

Welcome to New Beginnings in 2020. This year we will begin by revisiting the subject of serving communion at long term care facilities.  Parts of today’s post were published last year but I wanted to begin again on that subject for those who are just now starting to get involved in nursing home outreach. Most of us on the outside have the choice of receiving communion whenever we want. But for a nursing home resident the opportunity is limited to someone being willing to bring it in. So why is it any less vital to serve communion at a nursing home than it is at church?

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My personal acquaintance with nursing home ministry goes back thirty years and spans five different facilities where I have served. My first attempt at bringing in the communion ended in near disaster when the cork from the bottle of naturally carbonated grape juice popped off and whizzed across the room! Back then I had a team member from our church who helped me pass out the elements to the 6 or 8 people gathered in our small meeting. But over the years our attendance grew but my fellow volunteer had scheduling issues that left me to serve alone. At first I begged an occasional helper from church to come help; but sadly for a long time I simply gave up on the practice.

“I just wish I had someone to help me pass out communion.” I complained one day to Erin the activities director at Allied Services. “Why can’t we help you pass out the cups and the bread, Pastor Pete?”  Erin asked with surprise.

“Oh no it’s okay. I’ll find somebody.” I said. But what I really wanted was for people from my own church to serve communion. A couple of months passed after Erin’s first offer till I went back to her office. “Would your people really be willing to help me pass out the communion today?” I asked humbly.

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“No problem Pastor Pete!” she said smiling. Why was it such a big issue for me to ask for such a small favor? Maybe it was just a matter of pride, or just a general lack of awareness of the needs of our group.  By that time the meeting had grown to over twenty people. What a blessing it was to have workers who knew them by name and could know if they had physical issues which could prevent them from safely receiving the bread or the cup. From then, on at least once a month, any resident who wished to receive communion was given the opportunity.

So if you are involved in nursing home ministry and would like to begin bringing in the Lord’s Supper next week we’ll look at a few practical steps that can help you get started.

Hope at the Table

And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me. Luke 22:19

As Christians some of us share communion once a month, some every week and others each time they meet. But whenever we pause to share in the bread and the cup we are carrying on a retelling of the hour on the cross when Jesus freely gave His life to pay for our sins.

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Often I reflect on my own sins and ask Him to forgive me before I receive. Sometimes as I serve I look at each person as they come and think of how in a deep and holy way we are remembering that we all belong to Christ. Nothing has been preserved of the songs the first believers sang. We have no pictures of what they looked like. There isn’t even a single plate from which they ate. We can only guess where that first supper was eaten. But the common thread that our Lord Jesus has kept alive throughout more than 20 centuries is the Hope we have every time we come to His table.

 

We have hope that our sins are forgiven. We have renewed hope that we can learn to love one another. We are given a living demonstration of His love as the bread is broken and the cup is shared. We have new hope at the table that one day He will return for you and for me!