Wouldn’t Change a Thing – Moms

How precious also are Your thoughts to me, O God! How great is the sum of them!  If I should count them, they would be more in number than the sand. Psalm 139:17-18

Since the birth of Laura in our church family 6 months ago I have been getting a crash course in awareness of downs syndrome children and families. These moms who collaborated to make the video 50 Mums and 50 Kids, come together for this interview to give us all a sneak peek behind the scenes and help us to get in touch with the reality of both the blessings as well as the challenges presented by having a child with downs syndrome in their families.

What we experience with these mothers is a no strings attached love that reflects God’s love for all of us. He values us in a way that is not related to what others think of us or what he can get out of us. These mothers share that  the greatest challenge is to simply communicate that we don’t need to be afraid. Together we can tear down the walls that built on fear and the lack of personal experience.

As a long time chaplain at both nursing homes and an assisted living home that includes some residents with downs as well as various, emotional and physical disabilities one thing that I share with these Mums is the frustration in how little people outside our community seem to understand about us. These heart warming videos help to break down barriers as we see the real beauty of these kids and their mothers together. Pray for us that God would open new doors in long term care ministry as well. Have a blessed week!

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Dancing to Silent Night

What a lovely and very different idea for Christmas at this nursing home! The young children with the elderly connects the generations for Christmas. The idea of dance focuses everyone’s attention on the theme of Christ and His night. Even those who cannot hear well can enjoy the “Steps of Grace” children. Bravo!!! what a Christmas treat!!

Making Eye Contact

I loved this short video which Joni has on her You-tube channel. Though she is aiming it towards children, the lessons it teaches are for adults as well. You see, when we go into the Nursing Home to minister, eye contact is one of the most valuable gifts anyone can give. Eye contact says to that person, “You matter” and affirms that they are uniquely important to God.

Even when our residents cannot see well, they can still sense when we are speaking to them from the “Eye contact zone”. This is a zone of focus. This is a zone where we are genuinely listening to what they have to say. This is the zone that brings us close enough to lay a hand on their shoulder, give a warm handshake of greeting or a kiss to their forehead.

If you are new to nursing home ministry or if you have been faithfully serving for many years, take extra time to think about giving eye contact to people this week. It will bless others and as we look closely into the face of someone we may find that we will see the eyes of Jesus looking back into ours.

Matthew 25:45 He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.’

The Gift of Touch

When Jesus came down from the mountainside, large crowds followed him.  A man with leprosy came and knelt before him and said, “Lord, if you are willing, you can make me clean.” Jesus reached out his hand and touched the man. “I am willing,” he said. “Be clean!” Immediately he was cleansed of his leprosy Matthew 8:1-3

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When our friend Ken was sick this year we went to visit him, to pray for him and yes, to put our arms around him. Jesus often is found touching others. When the disciples were ready to send the children away it says that”…He took them in His arms, placed His hands on them and blessed them.”

There is something about touch that transmits the love of God. In nursing home ministry we need to remember that people are often longing to feel the touch of another person besides their nurse, or their physical therapist. A while back I can remember bringing one of our grandchildren along for my weekly visit to the nursing home. At that time he was about six years old  and feeling a little nervous about going with Poppy. When we came in, I began to introduce him. I thought that maybe if he could shake hands and say hello it would help him to feel at ease. No sooner did I start but one of the ladies in the circle put her arms out to him and when he came up for a hug she swept him off his feet and put him on her lap!

I worried at first, but after a few nervous seconds he settled down and sat with her for the first ten minutes of our meeting. He was finding out that our “ministry” had as much to do with snuggling on someone’s lap as it did with singing the hymns. While I was leading in prayer, he was giving a touch that said, “You are important. I trust you. I am happy to spend time right here with you.”

But you might say, “Oh Pastor Pete that’s okay for you because it’s your ministry.” But if you know one person among your neighbors who is a shut in, or in nursing care; if you have a family member of if you know someone from your church in long term care, it can be your ministry too! You do not need to go every week, or to join a group that sings in your local nursing home. Maybe you can just go to one person this week and give to them the gift of touch. God has called us to be the arms of Jesus touching someone and giving His blessing today!